Category Archives: cultivation

Using Tents vs. an Open Grow Room

One of the many decisions that you will have to make as a cannabis cultivator is how exactly you want to use the available space at your disposal.  If you have a bedroom or basement that can be transformed into a cultivation facility, should you purchase and put up a bunch of separate tents or just use the space as it is?  I would like to say that it’s a straightforward answer and everyone should be using tents but like most things in life each option has it’s benefits.

To start off, lets go over why I have used grow tents in all of my medical marijuana grows.  In my situation space has always been a constraint when it comes to producing the amount of plants that I would like to.  If you only have one room that you can dedicate to your garden there is no reason why you shouldn’t be using tents unless you’re really short on cash for equipment.  By adding tents you can have multiple stages of growth going on all contained and controlled separately.  This is a huge advantage because if you have grown cannabis in the past you know it takes a minimum of 3 months for the entire process from plant to harvest.  If you didn’t buy any tents and didn’t go through all the work of separating your room into a bunch of individual sections, your entire garden will be in the same growth stage.  To trigger flowering requires that there is only 12 hours of light per day, so if you want to have different growth stages you have to block the light from entering the flowering area.  In this business it’s all about the turnaround and if you can have another tent right behind your flowering one, there will be many more harvests in the same amount of time.

Tents are great for more then just separating the light cycles from the different areas of growth.  They also make containing the scent of your buds much more manageable than an open room full of skunky scents.  Adding a carbon filter to the air that is trapped inside will make it near impossible for uncleaned air to exit the tent.  In addition, all tents that I have installed also have hanging poles on the top making it easy to hang fans, lights, and carbon filters without any extra equipment.

If tents are so great then why do so many people still opt to go with the open grow room?  The most likely scenario where you would see rooms with no tents is in warehouses full of 5,000-10,000 plants.  If you are going to be producing on a large scale then using tents is going to be a waste of resources and just more unnecessary costs that you don’t need.  People that have multiple rooms can do the same separation I spoke of before, but on a much larger scale and without tents.  Rooms can be climate controlled just as easy as a tent so that is not an issue either.  When it comes to smell, the warehouse cultivation centers in recreational states don’t have to worry as much as most home growers with neighbors.  Hanging all your equipment and keeping plants of different heights at the appropriate distance from lighting will just take some extra creative designing on your part but still makes much more sense than installing a bunch of separate tents.

For those that grow on a small to medium sized scale at home,  I would highly suggest using tents to get the most money out of the same amount of time.  There is no doubt in my mind that it’s possible to grow high quality buds without containing your grow inside tents, but at the end of the day you might just have less bud and a stinky house.

 

 

 

Growing with High Pressure Sodium Lights

If high pressure sodium lights aren’t the most popular lighting systems used in cannabis grows, they are most definitely among the top 3 with florescent and metal halide.  These lights in the flowering stage, will provide the required energy for a bigger yield per wat in comparison to any type of grow light out there.  That’s a perk most growers can’t ignore, despite their higher electrical usage than alternatives like LED or CFL’s.

I like to start off the seedlings and the first few weeks of vegetative growth under a compact florescent set up.  After i feel the plant is strong enough to take the intensity from the high pressure sodium(it has several sets of leaves), I will replace the CFL”s with a 1000 watt High pressure sodium light.  I think this light works great for both the vegetative and flowering cycle of the plants life.  You most definitely can get away with using a different lighting system for the entire vegetative cycle.  I would highly recommend using these type of lights for flowering though because that’s where these bulbs really separate themselves from the rest.  Plants respond better to the red spectrum of lighting for flowering, as it promotes the plant to stretch and bud more efficiently.  Plants may also have a faster transition to flower under a light that is closer to the red spectrum.

One of the most important things to consider when choosing to go with a HPS, is cooling the growing environment.  There has to be a fan attached to the reflector at all times or it will emit too much heat for your medicine to be grown optimally.  As long as the area is well ventilated and you have hot air going out with fresh air coming in there is no issue with using these lights.  Remember that growing temperatures should be between 73-85 during the vegetative stage and you’ll have to compensate for this added heat.  A couple feet is a good maximum distance to separate the plants from the glass.

These lights are very powerful and they produce powerful medicine.  I remember my very first grow when I wasn’t too sure what I was doing outside of reading, and I purchased a high quality HPS bulb.  My first harvest turned out to be surprisingly good quality and I was quick to give credit to the expensive light.  My yield was low, but that was because I was still trying to figure out the correct nutrient mix and wasn’t using proper pruning techniques.  Now that I have a few years of growing experience I can say for sure that these lights will produce wonderful buds if you know what you are doing.  Start growing now and as young as you can, I can only imagine the quality of medicine I will be producing 20 years down the road.

Seeds or Clones?

One of the first decisions that you will have to make when starting a garden of your own is whether to go the route of purchasing either a clone from another gardener or start the delicate process from the very start.  There are different advantages for each method depending on how much experience you have growing, the size of your garden, and simply personal preferences.

I will start with my preferred method which is starting from the beginning with feminized seeds.  One of the main reasons people choose to go the other route is because seeds can either be male or female.  Seeds that turn out to be male plants will produce no flowers and will pollinate all of your’e existing female plants(If you don’t remove them prior to flowering) making their medicine also unusable.  Buying feminized seeds is one way to ensure you can start from the beginning and not be wasting your time.  The key reason that I choose to start from the seed is because that means you have complete control over the entire cycle and are not mixing your techniques with the previous grower.  This could mean for example that the clone that you purchased is in a different grow medium/mix then what you will be using for the rest of the process.  Outside of this problem, most growers agree that establishing good health in the seedling stage and early vegetation stage are key to having your plant run this marathon of a growing process.  So to have no control over this time frame is not something that interests me much as a grower.

Even though I made it sound like seeds are the superior way to go, clones most definitely have perks to them that many growers find attractive to their operation.  If you are operating a large scale grow operation or are trying to maximize the number of harvest you can get in a given period of time clones will definitely be ideal.  When you purchase a clone they are priced based on how far along they are in the growing period as well as the quality of the genetics you are taking a copy of.  Regardless, even if it is in the first few weeks of vegetative growth you saved yourself nearly a month in time.  It takes almost a week for germination and another week of growth as a seedling before it reaches a foot or so in height.  So you most definitely are cutting time out of the harvest cycle.  Large operations could benefit because they can simply take cuttings off their other plants and plant them in the ground and get the exact same genetic copy.  No money is spent on seeds, time is saved, and you know exactly what to expect out of that plant months in the future.  This eliminates the problems of purchasing them from another grower and having different growing techniques.  If you currently have a lot of plants growing, it would be foolish to not take advantage of cloning.

Happy Growing!

Northern Lights Strain Review

The northern lights when grown correctly will have you staring up at the night sky as if you really were in Alaska enjoying the northern lights.  Besides an amazing hybrid high that you can feel throughout the entire body, the most notable trait is the flavor.  It’s best described as very piney and organic and has a sweet aroma to it, especially when burned.  I’ve done two separate runs of this strain now and have been impressed by the yield that these plants give.  Even though she won’t reach very tall heights because of their indica dominant nature, it will branch out and still produce tons of budding sites if pruned correctly.

The flowering time for this phenotype is in the 8-9 week range although I have harvested after week 8 both times because the trichomes are really milky already at that point.  If you read my previous article you’d know I’m using coco coir as my preferred grow medium and this plant responded great to it.  I would definitely classify this strain as a good beginners strain for those starting out in growing because it really doesn’t pose many problems and is quick to recover from errors with nutrients, ph, etc.  It definitely needs to be up kept as it will grow extremely bushy and may take up too much of your grow area if you don’t trim it up regularly during veg.  Out of the 3 different strains that I have grown it is my favorite so far across all important categories.  As long as you flush the plant properly at the end, the flavor should be hard to match, it’s very unique.  If you’re a medical cannabis grower I would definitely add this to your garden if you have patients that are dealing with severe pain.  This one works very well for those that need relief in different parts of the body.  It relaxes the muscles much more then your typical hybrid or sativa strain and you can find yourself asleep before you know it with higher doses.

This strain is extremely popular and most likely would not be hard to find at your local compassion club.  I have come across this strain a number of times outside of my own stash of seeds and I’m sure many of you readers have had the pleasure of trying it as well. What other medical uses have you guys found this particular phenotype to help deal with?  Share your experiences with growing/sampling this strain.

Growing in Coco Coir-The Essentials

I have found after using a few different types of grow mediums I have settled with coco coir as my go to.  It’s best described as a soil-less medium that is like a hybrid between hydroponic growing and soil growing.  It has the characteristics of hydroponic growing when it comes to oxygen level to the roots and you’ll have to add all the required nutrients externally.  There are no nutrients provided in the medium at all so the feeding schedule would look much similar a hydroponic grow than a soil one.  However, hydro systems usually involve placing the plant directly in nutrient solution without any kind of medium.  Coco has a different texture than soil but it has to be watered by hand just like any soil plant would be watered.

If you would like to pursue this method of growing I would also suggest a few things I’ve come across when using it.  Plants seem to really flourish when there is some perlite in the mixture because it adds even more aeration to the plants roots.  Coco does a great job of this on its own due to its fiber like texture and plants love this mixture more than anything I’ve yet tried.  Another thing to keep in mind is that the plants will have to be watered much more often than a soil plant.  Just like the oxygen flows right through the medium, so does water.  It doesn’t hold water and nutrients that well so you will find yourself watering every other day.  This can become a problem for the avid traveler because roots could dry up on them without a consistent watering cycle.

Even taking into the consideration the negatives involved in a coco coir grow, I find it a very effective method to grow high quality cannabis.  Obviously there are far more determining factors than just the grow medium but I think it can be an advantage over a traditional soil grow or difficult hydro system.  For beginners it’s ideal, you just have to know the best amount of nutrients to use in feeding.  This will all depend on what type of nutrients you choose as a grower.  I stick with General Hydroponics but there are many different options that will vary in cost and results.  Everybody grows differently and there is no doubt amazing weed that’s been grown organically in soil and in a complete hydro system, so choose what works for your environment and preference.  I would highly recommend this grow medium though mostly due to the great aeration and direct grower control over nutrients in the plant.